Learning Opportunities: Self-Assessment for Supervisors


Learning Opportunities: Self-Assessment for Supervisors

In this assessment, the 16 competencies are considered the vital few that are crucial for new supervisors. They represent what supervisors need to do well in order to be successful leaders. This list is based on years of experience in supervision and management, and grounded in a solid body of theory and research concerning the particularities of professional supervision.

Influence

A supervisor with influence is able to persuade others to accept a desired point of view, to gain support and commitment from others, and to effect change in others' behavior. The essence of leadership is influence. Unless what you say and how you act have a positive influence on the attitudes and behavior of your people, you are not their leader. Much has been said and written about differences between managing and leading. It is clear that people don't want to be managed — they want to be led. The best way to increase your influence is to encourage your people, tell them about where you want the group to go in the service of the organization's vision, and model the way. 

Facilitation

An effective supervisor leads meetings or group efforts without directing the outcome, creates an environment of openness and trust, and leads groups to decisions in which all participants feel a sense of ownership. Many new supervisors are reluctant to have group meetings with their people. This competency serves efficiency in that it enables you to inform, instruct and listen to your people all at once. Because supervisors must lead meetings and facilitate discussions, it is important to remember that leading a discussion is not the same as running a meeting. Facilitating discussion requires promoting evenness of participation, capturing key points and assuming a non-judgmental attitude, especially about people's feelings.

Planning and Organizing

The supervisor are developing comprehensive project plans, monitors progress against goals, assigns clear responsibilities and breaks work down into manageable portions. New supervisors need to know how to work with others to develop plans for how and when things will be accomplished. It is important to resist the temptation to hold on to the power that seems to come from making decisions alone. Empowering others to make decisions helps them develop skills, encourages them to take responsibility and enables you to get your own tasks accomplished. Be .careful not to practice what has been called 'leave alone, zap' supervision. You need to show your people how to succeed, observe them and provide regular feedback on their progress. A supervisor is ultimately a front-line trainer and people developer. Working collaboratively to establish work plans and organize tasks is an excellent way to empower the people you supervise.


Analysis

Supervisors need to gather relevant Information, consider abroad range of issues and factors, perceive relationships with in a range of information and use logic effectively. This competency is vital for new supervisors because you must work with a range of information to accomplish your own tasks and lead your people effectively. The Total Quality Movement in many organizations resulted in a culture shift toward an emphasis on using data to specific plans. New supervisors therefore need to be available to consult with managers, associates and peers on data-based problem solving. You also need to be good at thinking through situations logically and making moves based on the best available information.

Decision Making

Supervisors must make timely and effective decisions. Delaying or putting off decisions can be frustrating for your team and may cause you to miss windows of opportunity. But timely decisions are not necessarily quick ones. Decisions must be based on solid data and take into account potential impacts on the people affected by them and on the organization as a whole, Effective decision making also involves assessing the importance of the outcome for the organization, the amount of time available, the degree to which people trust each other and how a particular decision will be accepted by various parties.

Delegating

Supervisors must effectively assign tasks to others while taking responsibility for any results. In delegating, they should take into account both the skill levels of employees and the difficulty of assignments. Supervision that produces results requires working with your people in ways that encourage them to take on specific work tasks. Delegating tasks can be a developmental strategy. You can sell the benefits of taking on a task to an individual or team to challenge them to stretch towards new goals. Supervisors still need to maintain a connection in order to observe relevant behaviors and provide specific feedback. Delegation is also a way to unload some tasks that are overloading you. Something that you consider a chore may be a meaningful or desirable responsibility for someone else.

Follow-up and Commitment

Effective supervisors follow plans through to closure, persist despite obstacles and keep their word. Most plans fail in the implementation stage. Supervisors must be good at monitoring progress toward the goals of a specific plan and, when necessary, adjusting the strategies and tactics used to carry it out. For example, you may need to run interference for your people to help them produce desired outcomes on and within budget. When you commit to support your team's implementation of plans, it
is critical that you do what you promise — not doing so rapidly erodes trust. Acting reliably will inspire your people to follow your leadership faithfully.


Communication

Successful communication often depends on speaking clearly, expressing oneself well in groups and conveying ideas in terms the listener can understand. Communication may be the most vital competency m this set. Your success as a supervisor is directly related to your effectiveness asa communicator. The two skills that make up this competency are self-expression and the ability to build on the ideas of others. Of course, people must be able to understand you, so if you mumble or have a heavy accent you may need to work on developing clear speech. The goals are to make your message clear and to be understood accurately. 

Listening

Supervisors should demonstrate attentive listening and convey their understanding to others. Listening is closely related to a competency in communication, You need to commit to a lifetime of continuous development in this area. This competency requires keeping one's mind open to what others say, and attending to both the content of what they say and the feelings they are expressing (consciously and unconsciously). Listening effectively involves checking your understanding of others' messages by reflecting what you hear, using phrases such as, 'What I hear you saying is [X]' , or 'You seem to be concerned about [X]'.

Managing Conflict

Supervisors need to identify sources of conflict, to turn conflict into a constructive exchange of ideas and to keep energy focused on desired outcomes. Conflict is seldom resolved. There are almost always lingering feelings after the parties to a conflict reach an agreement. Sometimes the result is simply an impasse ate which people agree to disagree, and no commitment is made to change. Often a supervisor can encourage parties to look beneath a conflict, to isolate its root causes and make decisions at a more fundamental level. This competency requires being able to communicate with the parties in a conflict and to work together toward improvement, even when you are one of the conflicting parties. In dealing with any conflict, remember that the glue that can bind people together is commitment to shared goals. Work with others to make those commitments explicit and consider all exchanges in the context of desired results.

Fostering Teamwork

Supervisors clarify roles and responsibilities. Many organizations have flattened their structure and as a result supervisors have more people reporting directly to them. This means that supervisors have less time with each individual associate. A good strategy for success in this context is to forge work teams from groups of employees whose work is interdependent or whose goals require collaboration. Remember that groups are not teams. Effective teams can accomplish more than can a collection of Lone Rangers. You need to excel at facilitating the formation of effective teams, and you must provide individual members with clear roles and responsibilities. Supervisors should create teams that
are capable of effective problem solving within an atmosphere of trust and collaboration. 

Technical and Functional Expertise

Supervisors should possess current knowledge of their profession and industry and be regarded as experts. Supervisors absolutely need to know the work, but that does not mean they should function primarily as Troubleshooters. Your people should view you as knowledgeable and skillful so they will be inclined to consult with you on difficulties they encounter Commit-yourself to remaining current on the content of the tasks you supervise. This entails continuously studying emerging trends and effective practices in your organization's industry and in the professions of the people who report to you. 

Time Management

It is important for supervisors to be able to set efficient work priorities, work on many tasks simultaneously and balance the importance and urgency of tasks. 

In computer terms, supervisors need to be highly competent in multitasking or working on several tasks almost simultaneously. Expect many interruptions that will require your complete attention for at least a few minutes. To remain effective as a supervisor you need to be able to maintain your priorities, and you need to know when to drop everything and focus on a situation that demands your attention. Managing your time effectively requires knowing what is important and what is comparatively trivial, and consistently focusing on critical tasks. 

Channeling Motivation

Supervisors must be good at encouraging others to achieve desired results and at creating enthusiasm and commitment in others. 

It is not really possible to motivate another person. (Try motivating a teenager who is not doing things your way!) Instead, work from the premise that people are already motivated. Your people do not want to fail, and some of them want to be real winners. In encouraging your associates, it is important to know what motivates them and to link work tasks to those inner drives. To discover what motivates people, it is more helpful to ask questions than to try to read minds. The ability to link your team members' motivations to your expectations is a vital competency that is likely to create a committed work group. 

Coaching and Developing

Provide timely, specific and constructive feedback and give challenging developmental Training employees is not only the responsibility of trainers. Supervisors are also frontline developers of employees. You therefore need to observe, give feedback to and suggest improvements for the people you supervise. Coaching can be thought of as a form of teaching whereby you help an individual develop necessary job skills. Being a coach requires skill and patience. Your communication and listening competencies will help make you a good coach. 16. Providing direction. Supervisors need to provide clear direction, set clear priorities and foster a common vision. Employees need to know•where you and the rest of the management are taking the organization. You therefore need to be highly articulate in spelling out the vision, mission, purpose and values of the organization. Supervisors should be effective at enrolling people in collaborative work toward a shared vision in ways that are consistent with the espoused values of the organization. Work with your people to establish priorities that are clearly in line with the organization's goals.

Providing direction



Supervisors need to provide clear direction, set clear priorities and foster a common vision. Employees need to know•where you and the rest of the management are taking the organization. You therefore need to be highly articulate in spelling out the vision, mission, purpose and values of the organization. Supervisors should be effective at enrolling people in collaborative work toward a shared vision in ways that are consistent with the espoused values of the organization. Work with your people to establish priorities that are clearly in line with the organization's goals.
Learning Opportunities: Self-Assessment for Supervisors Learning Opportunities: Self-Assessment for Supervisors Reviewed by Naukari Click on June 06, 2019 Rating: 5

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